Border design


I’m still beavering away on The Blanket Of Doom. However, in the meantime, I’ve been asked a few times about stitches I used on the border on the second of my Cuddlebums Shades Blankets (see here for the Tada! on this). Here is how I did it…

Uk terms.

Round 1. A round of trebles.  To start I chained 3. In each square corner space I made 2 trebles, a treble in the join square and then 2 trebles in the next corner space. At the corners of the blanket I made 5 trebles in the corner space

Round 2. The crab stitch row. This is a row of double crochet but made backwards. This is a bit peculiar the first time you try it but its pretty easy one you get going. There is a good ‘how to’ here. To start I chained 1. In the corner space, I made 3 crab stitches. 
Round 3 Another round of trebles but made in the trebles from Round 1 rather than Round 2. This means the crab stitch from round 2 sits up. To start I chained 3. In the corner space I made 5 trebles.

Round 4. A round of half trebles. To start I chained 2. In the corner space I made 3 half trebles.

Round 5. The bobble row. This took a bit of thinking about. I ended up making 4 trebles then a bobble which is 5 trebles together. There is a good ‘how to’ here albeit it using 3 trebles rather than 5. I used 4 trebles as my ‘spacer’ because it allowed me to pop a bobble neatly in each corner and at the join line of each of the squares and have them neatly spaced between but how many trebles you have in between each bobble would depend on how you wanted to arrange them. For me it was trial and error. To start I chained 3. In the corners, I made a treble, the bobble stitch, and then another treble.

Round 6. As round 4

Round 7. The scallop round. To start I did a slip stitch around until I reached the half treble stitch from round 6 which sat on top of the bobble stitch from 5. Then I chained 3 and made 6 trebles in the 4th stitch from my hook. Then I skipped 4 and made 7 trebles in the next stitch (again above the bobble stitch). This skip 4, 7 trebles in the next stitch forms the pattern. At the corners I did 9 trebles in the corner stitch.


There was also a bit of fudging sometimes to get the numbers to work. For some odd reason I didn’t have the same number of stitches on all 4 sides of my blanket – yep, slap dash work on my part – but there was no way I was going back to sort that out, so in a few places I only made 3 trebles instead of 4  on row 5 which then meant I had to remember and only skip 3 instead of 4 stitches on row 7, and I’m a bobble short on each side at the corners. There was also a fair amount of frogging. I frogged a whole round of trebles because I decided they weren’t working, which was a difficult decision to take given each round was taking such a long time. 

With hindsight, I would have worked out my stitch counts before I got started but, hey ho, you live and learn, and what is life without whimsy.

Cuddlebums 2015 Shades Blanket Club finally finished

Yes! This is just about the first time ever that I’ve made a resolution and stuck to it for more than about a week. If you havent caught up on my resolutions you can read about them here.

It’s so gratifying when you decide to do something and then actually do it until it is done. I really don’t know why I don’t do it more often? Actually, I do, but that not the subject of this post. This post is to revel in the joy that I actually finished something. And a big something at that.


When I signed up to the blanket club at the start of 2015, I had lots of good intententions to prioritise this project. I would make the squares each month when the yarn came in, above all other projects. That lasted until about March, and then things started to slip a little further each month until we got to the end of the club and I realised I wasn’t even close to being half way through making all the squares. This was a blow because I had hoped to present my children with a blanket each for Christmas that year. The realisation dawned that if it was going to be a Christmas present, it would have to be Christmas 2016. You can see how these things get away from themselves!


Anyway, it became my travel project. For a period of about 9 months, I took a ball of the yarn with me everywhere I went and diligently made squares. Actually this made the making very easy. It took me between 15 and 20 minutes to make one square and I got between 9 and 10 squares from a ball, so I spent all the odd 1/2 hours waiting while my children played at various soft plays, theme parks and beaches, making the squares. It was the ideal portable project.

Then I finished the squares and the project quickly became extremely non portable. But I was on a roll and I quickly (well, relatively quickly!) assembled the first blanket. This is it!


And finally, I’ve finished the second. I’m going to let the (many!) photos speak for themselves.








I can wait to put them on the children’s beds.

Next up, The Blanket Of Doom. I kid you not!

Crafting on the move

I was caught out by a flat tyre late one evening last week, and to my horror I discovered I did not have any yarn craft with me. My crafting is usually fairly portable. It’s quick and easy to pop needles or hook and yarn in a bag and, with all my patterns stored on my iPad, I’m off! In fact I almost always have a small portable project in my bag just in case I find myself unexpectedly waiting somewhere. But not this evening. I had to endure a wait for rescue without the calming comfort of yarn and needles or hook. 

For the last year or so, my portable project has been my Cuddlebums Yarn shades blanket. Each month I would receive four balls of lovely colour from Jodi and would pop one ball at a time in my bag until I found odd scraps of time to crocheted it into squares, and then I replace the completed squares with the next ball and so the project continues. Because of this I’ve been quite relaxed about delays and inconvenience, as I know I can just whip out my crochet to pass the time. Making squares is a brilliant portable project because they take up so little space, and require very little concentration. You just have to remember to stop when you get to the requisite size of square (in the early days of this blanket, I frequently overshot and had to frog back but, the longer the project has gone on, the better I have got at paying attention just enough to stop at the right point). And because you are making the squares in time which would otherwise be wasted, you can, over some months, produce a blanket without it feeling like a huge and daunting undertaking.


In this case, I’m making two blankets, one for each of my children; they will be almost the same but will also be subtly different. A couple of weeks ago,  I finished crocheting the last of the balls of colour (a gorgeous purple), which is why I didnt have anything to do when I got the flat tyre. So now,  I will need to start on the blanket assembly. As you join the squares together, this naturally makes the project much less portable so it will become a stay at home project to be worked week on in my evenings. 


I’m sad to see the end of these squares and, for the sake of my sanity should I get another puncture, I will need to seriously think about what my next portable project will be as I don’t have one ready and waiting. Everything in my yarny pipeline is either too complex or too bulky to make an ideal portable project.


In the meantime, I’m turning my attention to sewing in all the ends on the crocheted squares (and wondering quietly to myself the entire time, why I didn’t sew them in as I went along. There are approximately 800, give or take). I also need to decide on a joining method and an edging and this will necessitate a trawl through Ravelry and my various books and pamphlets so it is a subject I will need to come back to another day. Right now my focus needs to be Project Portable!