Don’t even think about getting your workout wardrobe in shape

At this point every year, I start to experience feelings of sadness at the passing of a year, but excitement at the prospect of the start of a new one. This is, of course, ridiculous, as very little will change at midnight in the 31st December. Despite any resolutions I may make, I will still wake up on 1st January 2019 as fundamentally the same person I was in 2018. So will everybody else.

I realise that this might not be a popular view point and I might be on the receiving end of a few Bah Humbug! comments for saying this but, most of what we do, is done habitually, and habits take lots of time and attention to change, and so, no matter what I resolve, I’m strongly suspecting I won’t be much different in February 2019 than I was in November 2018.

It seems to me, the making (and breaking) of New Year’s resolutions has become just another opportunity to spend money. In recent days, I have been urged to join gyms, start expensive diet plans and even “get my workout wardrobe in shape”.

This last one is particularly ludicrous. I seriously question why anyone would want to buy a lot of expensive gym wear before starting a new exercise regime. Yes, I know it can be confidence boosting to have nice new things. But it’s unlikely that you are going to be half way through your exercise session and desperate to take a rest but think “No! I must not stop. My workout wardrobe is in shape…”.

* * *

So 2018 was a very mixed year for me. My family ended 2017 to the news that my Mum, after many years fighting against an incurable cancer, was at the end of her life. Her bone marrow had failed and whilst the wonderful NHS would do all they could with blood transfusions and antibiotics to keep her going, she wasn’t going to stage a miraculous recovery. So we all knew that 2017 was going to be her last Christmas with us and, whilst we tried to keep to the same family traditions, it was all unbearably sad.

She hung on, weary and in pain, with ever increasing amounts of time in bed and in hospital, until April. It was horrible to see her, once so vibrant and such a force within our family, become so diminished. The end, when it finally came, was, mercifully, very quick.

I miss her greatly. I always will.

* * *

It’s hard to go from that to an upbeat “Yay! I launched my yarn dyeing business” announcement but that is basically what happened. I’d been wanting to do it for a while, and I talked about my plans with Mum, but then put life on hold while she was really unwell. In a peculiar way, her passing was just the boot up the bum I needed to get on with it. Life is dismayingly short, so do more of what you love, has become my motto of sorts.

I’ve been lucky enough to have the time to learn how to naturally dye with plants. Even though I know it is really only chemistry (and, for the first time ever, I really do wish I’d paid more attention in ‘O’ level chemistry), it feels like there is something magical about dyeing wool with plant colour, using some of the same techniques our ancestors did for thousands of years (see here for my post about dyeing with woad). I love the slow mindfulness of the process; growing or foraging for plant material, extracting the dye from it, sometimes over many days, and then encouraging that colour to stick onto the wool, with just enough heat, but not too much. Some of my most beautiful colours were achieved during the heat of the summer, when I just left the dye pot out in the heat on our patio, for the whole day. Serendipity has a big part to play in the process, and I’ve learned to embrace and love it.

And this has changed me more than any resolution I have ever made. Years spent as an accountant, in thrall to a timesheet and billing, meant I used to be all about getting to the end point as quickly as possible. The end product was the most important thing. The process was just something to be got through or endured. But, being forced by nature to wait for results, has made me enjoy the process so much more. And not just with my yarn dyeing but with my knitting, baking, and even, dare I say it, chores too.

* * *

Those of you who follow me on Instagram or Facebook may know that I’m exhibiting my wares at Unravel in February (for details, see here). As a newbie, I’m very grateful to them for affording me the opportunity to come along. Planning for this has been in full swing for ages. as it takes a long time to prepare for a big show using natural dyes, and especially when you have just one (overworked!) dye pot, so I’m hoping I can do justice to the opportunity. Please do come and say hi if you visit the show.

So, I’m starting 2019 both excited and nervous about Unravel and not really able to think about much beyond it. So, I shan’t be making any resolutions at this stage. I’ve planned a period of quiet assessment at the end of February, and that’s as far as I can go with my head as full as it currently is.

And, this is my point (and, if you are still reading, well done for hanging on in there!), you don’t need it to be 1st January to make changes. Clear a tiny bit of head space, identify the things you love, and do more of them. Do them with care. Enjoy the process of the doing.

And please don’t, even for a moment, think you need to get your workout wardrobe in shape.

Drowning In Plastic

So I caught a TV program a couple of weeks ago, on BBC1 called Drowning In Plastic (see here). Everyone I know who has seen it has been shocked. I think what surprised me most is the potential for micro plastics to enter the human food chain; a report out this week shows this is already happening (see here). Government advice is currently that adults should eat at least two portions of fish each week. If that fish contains tiny particles of plastic, and plastic gives off some nasty chemicals, so that’s a problem (see here, for example, for the effect on sperm counts). As is the potential for micro plastics in our drinking water.

So I wanted to write about what I’ve been doing to minimise my own plastic consumption, and maybe inspire you to do a bit more. I’ve long been a supporter of buying my fruit, vegetables and meat from places other than supermarkets (our local butcher, farm shop and a veg box scheme do a great job here) and I have used reusable shopping bags for almost two decades, so I was almost entirely unaffected when the 5p charge was introduced in the UK, but I was glad of it, nonetheless.

What actually started me thinking about plastic again was our holiday in Sennen Cove, in Cornwall, this summer. There is a noticeboard near the beach explaining how plastic damages sea life and the children got into a conversation about it, the result of which was us doing a daily 2 minute beach clean (see here for this initiative). Sennen Cove is a beautiful beach, and, at first glance looks pristine. But our daily beach cleans showed it was full of hidden litter, most of which was plastic. This is a typical example of the litter we found on just one day. And everyday we found a similar quantity and mix.

So then I started looking around on the internet and I came across the Plastic Free July initiative. The aim of this was to look at giving up single-use plastic. The initiative suggests you start by saving all your plastic waste for a week and then look into ways to reduce that. So that’s what I did.

Milk and More

Now I thought I’d be pretty pleased with the small amounts we used but, no. By the end of the week, it was a veritable mountain of bottles and wrappers. Most of those bottles were milk bottles. I have small children and we are fond of rice pudding and custard so we get through a lot of milk in our house. And this is bourn out by the knowledge that I was seemingly continually just popping to the shops to drag home another plastic wrapped 4 pinter. I’m old enough to remember glass milk bottles delivered by a milkman – I’m guessing I was well into my teens when my mother switched to buying it in plastic bottles from the supermarket. And I was unconsciously aware that milkmen had mostly gone the way of greengrocers and butchers when supermarkets took over, i.e. out of business except in niche areas. But, given it is a 13 mile round trip to our nearest supermarket (that’s what you get from living in the sticks), whilst I was keen to give up the necessity of frequent trips, I really didn’t think I’d be able to get a delivery out here (pizza and Indian restaurant businesses, please also take note!). So I Googled “milkman near me” and to my surprise the company Milk and More delivered in my area. So now I have a milkman. His name is Ricky and he delivers, like a super stealthy ninja, early in the morning on Tuesdays, Thursday and Saturdays. I also get orange and apple juice in glass bottles from Ricky, and organic eggs, and dry goods like porridge, and also luxuries like scrummy artisan bakery meringues.

There is a cost to this. My milk definitely costs more than it does when I buy it in the supermarket. This is because milk is generally sold at a loss making price in the supermarkets because the stores recognise that the continual need for milk brings customers into the store (and have you ever noticed how far back into the store the refrigerators for milk are!?) and when they are in the store, customers pop lots of other things in their baskets and trolleys, on impulse, which is where the stores actually make all their money. And this is the thing. because I’m not constantly in the shops buying milk, I’m also not constantly in the shops buy lots of other snack foods and impulse buys. So I’m actually not spending as much money as I did and am doing a lot less driving about in the car.

There is also a much underrated feel good factor around having milk delivered by a milkman. I get a small glow of happiness when I put my empty milk bottles out on the step the night before a delivery and the children are delighted by getting the milk in from the doorstep in the morning. But its more than that. The fact is, milkmen provide a vital service to more elderly or infirm folk who can’t always get to the shops. And consequently a milkman could be the first person to spot that the previous day’s milk hasn’t be brought in and that the elderly or infirm person might be in need of help. By supporting my milkman, I’m also supporting this part of his service.

Keeping clean

So, with milk ticked off the list, the next generator of plastic in my house was kitchen cleanser, soaps and laundry liquid. As I’ve said, I have small children and the sticky fingerprints are legion. I’ve long used Ecover products, because of the worry around liberally spraying chemicals near my children, so my next move wasn’t as big a leap as it might be for some people. I have recently read the book No Is Not Enough by Naomi Klein. In that book, when talking about protesters joining indigenous peoples in an encampment near a proposed pipeline route, she mentions the use of sage as an antibacterial cleanser.

This got me thinking, and after some (more) google research I found this recipe for making your own kitchen spray. So I waited until I used up my current kitchen spray and instead of putting the spray bottle in the recycling I made my own cleaning fluid and reused the spray bottle. The cleaning fluid doesn’t have any particular odour so I fragranced it with a couple of drops of eucalyptus essential oil and it is as effective as other cleaners at cleaning my work surfaces. Just about the only thing to get over is the brown colour of the liquid. And as sage grows like a weed in my garden, at a much faster rate than I can make stuffing with, it’s totally free. And because I’m reusing the bottle, that one less piece of plastic in the system.

So I also mentioned soap above and I’d previously always bought liquid hand soap, more or less by default. Again, liquid hand soap wasn’t a thing when I was a child but my mum had switched to it when it started to become popular and I’d just followed what she did without giving it a thought. And liquid hand soap comes in plastic bottles. So after some (yet more) googling I ended up buy some books on soap making and had some fun making my own Lavender and Camomile soap. Although I was desperate to try it, it actually takes around 6 weeks to cure so I had to be patient. But I can now report, it is lovely. It’s novelty factor also means my children are suddenly keen to wash their hands, although I doubt the phenomenon will last. I will definitely be making some more for Christmas presents, maybe with some other fragrances too.

Lastly was laundry liquid. Again, I already use Ecover but the plastic bottles it comes in was an issue for me. I can get the bottle refilled at a hardware store a few miles away, but they don’t have the concentrated liquid so this would still mean lots of extra car journeys. However, the alternatives like soap nuts also came with ethical problems that I couldn’t quite square off. So I put it to the back of my mind.

But recently, I posted on my Instagram Stories about it being conker season (conker season is a BIG thing when you have 7 year olds) and one of my IG friends told me you can make your own laundry liquid from conkers. Yes, you heard me. Laundry liquid from conkers. There is a great how to in this article on Wasteland Rebel.

So in the interests of intrepid reporting (or as intrepid as its possible to be within the confines of your own kitchen), I whizzed up some conkers in my food processor (and my goodness they do make a racket!), added some water, and 24 hours later had a small supply of laundry liquid. And it works surprisingly well; at least as well as the Ecover I’d been using. I fragranced it with a few drops of lavender essential oil but it doesn’t really need it. It was particularly lovely in my woollen wash where it made everything super soft. If you also have small children and consequently, a supply of conkers in your house at the moment, I’d really recommend you try it.

Plastic free business

And lastly, I wanted to let you know what I’d been doing in my yarn dyeing business to reduce my use of plastics. I always take pride in the fact that my business is basically creating a valuable resource from something which is an undervalued by-product of the British meat industry. And now I’m dyeing it more and more with plant materials, and often waste plant materials like avocado pits and onion skins, it is pretty low on any planetary impact scale. But there is always room for improvement. So, I’ve taken the decision to stop stocking wool/nylon blends. I’d pretty much come to the conclusion that its not really necessary anyway – I only stocked it in yarn intended for socks and it’s much better to use a wool with natural properties appropriate for the job of socks than to try to make inappropriate wool fit for the task by adding nylon. There are a very few skeins left in the shop but, once they are used up, I won’t be restocking it.

I’ve also sourced paper postal bags and packaging. These took their own sweet time to arrive (maybe the manufacturer had been inundated with orders? I hope so!) and while I was waiting, I used brown paper to package up parcels. Now the paper postal bags have arrived, I’m thrilled with them. I’ve carried out some durability tests (including mailing yarn to myself and then leaving the parcel out on the doorstep in the rain) and am very pleased with how they perform.

All these things taken individually are tiny actions, but together they make a big difference to the amount of plastic our family produces. But, I’m sure there is more I can do, so, if you have any suggestions, please do share them by commenting below.

Flockfest goodies

A quick share of my Flockfest goodies.

My first purchase was a gorgeous giant skein of Corriedale chunky from Hedgeknits. My stand was next to Rita’s stand and I’d spotted this giant heap of woolly gorgeousness pretty early on, but was trying to restrain myself. But it’s naturally dyed, and I kept seeing other people pick it up and I couldn’t bear the thought of it going home with someone else AND it goes really well with the purple skein I bought when I last visited Flock on the Plain, so I caved and it has come home with me.

I also bought some funky vintage purple buttons from the lovely display by Hailstone Heritage which will go brilliantly as decoration on the garment I intend to make from the Hedgeknits yarn.

My next purchase was from Mahoodly and I just love the depth of Becca’s colours. I bought a gorgeous deep dark blue 4 ply and a brighter blue mini Skein which will become rib socks with contrasting heel and toe.

I spent a long time mesmerised by Girl’s Own Store’s sock knitting machine. It was a wonder to beyond and I would really love one. But alas, the budget won’t stretch that far and so, instead, I bought a pair of her super cosy socks dyed with onion skins.

From Woolaroo, I bought some lovely balls of Shetland wool which are from a flock near her home and hand spun by a lady living in the village. Such precious wool. I don’t have a project in mind but I think Knit British is going to have a Natural Shades KAL later this year so I’ll save these balls up for that.

I also swopped a skein of my Radical 4ply for this lovely Bonnie Prince Charlie yarn from Somerset Soda. Just look at those colours! I don’t have a project for this yet. I might pair it up with other skeins in my stash and make one of Boyland Knitworks gorgeous sweaters.

So, quite a modest haul by my standards. Did you make any purchases on Yarn Shop Day?

Flockfest, here I come!

So, it’s Yarn Shop Day tomorrow (Saturday 12th May) and I’m exhibiting, along with lots of other dyers and purveyors of buttons etc, at Flockfest at Flock on the Plain in Woodbury in Wiltshire. To say I’m excited, is to significantly understate how I’m feeling.

I thought I’d give you all a preview of some of the hand dye British wool I’m taking with me.

I have totally fallen I love with these Blue Faced Leicester sock weight mini skeins. They are such a lovely pop of colour. They are 80 meters/20g each and are sold in sets of five. They are spun with a high twist so are perfect for socks.

I’m also taking a Blue Faced Leicester/Nylon Sock weight mix with me. Basically this is for the Nervous Nellies who don’t believe a yarn is strong enough for socks without nylon (although I do love it too and am making socks from it at the moment). This is also spun with a high twist and is sold in 100g hanks.

I’m also taking my Audacious base in DK and 4ply weights. This Wensleydale yarn has such a lovely lustre and I particularly love the ply on the 4ply weight. It will be lovely made into shawls. Both the DK and the 4ply are sold in 100g hanks.

Lastly, this is my Saucy DK base. This yarn come from Dorset Horn sheep, a breed listed as threatened on the Livestock Conservancy watchlist, so I’m particularly excited to be showing this. I just can’t describe how well this yarn takes a dye. Look at the pics to see what I mean. I’ve just dyed up a few skeins of this yarn currently but I plan to dye up a some sweater quantities as I think it will make lovely garments.

So, if you are local to Woodborough in Wiltshire do come and squish the yarn. It will be lovely to see you.

March and April makes

Eep! How can it be the second week of May and I still haven’t shown you my March and April makes? To be fair to myself, I’ve had a lot to process emotionally. I’ll tell you all about it in time, I’m just not ready to share it quite yet.

But I will share my makes. First up was my Siri Cardigan. I just adore this. Knitting the textured yoke was hard on the hands but once that was done, it was a speedy knit. I love the patten so much, I’m planning a Siri sweater for next year. The yarn was from Skein Queen but, alas, has been discontinued.

Next to be finished were some socks in my Dad’s team colours (Brentford F.C. Go Bees!) in a fun self striping merino/nylon mix from Devon Sun Yarn. My Dad’s circulation isn’t great due to a long term disability so he was delighted with hand knit socks.

Also finished in March was a hat of my own design for my brother in Ryeland wool. I knew as soon as I cast on with this yarn, that it wanted to be a hat. It’s such a naturally stretchy wool that it’s great for things that need some negative ease. I dyed the hat, after I knitted it and the one consolation to a late Spring was that my brother was able to get some wear out of his hat straight away. He has declared it very warm which is another plus for Ryeland.

I knitted the first of what has now become several Sweater Bunts for my hand dyed yarn business. They are so cute, I love knitting them. This one is in my Brazen DK base which is British Jacob Wool and would make a great full size sweater. You can visit my shop here.

My final finished item in April was my Stronachlachar sleeveless sweater by Kate Davies Designs knitted in Brune by Daughter of a Shepherd. This was the first garment I’d knitted in naturally dark coloured wool and it is lovely; properly sheepy. However, the combination of darker yarn and a pattern that required concentration right to the end meant it wasn’t a particularly easy evening knit.

In April I also cast on a Flukra hap by Gudrun Johnston. In a burst of madness that I can only blame on my overly emotional state, I decided to make the hap square instead of triangular, as in the pattern. Being a novice hap maker, this has meant lots of head scratching and frogging but I’m onto the lace now so I’m hoping it will be relatively straightforward from here on in. I’m knitting it in a Teeswater lace weight yarn. It’s the first thing I have ever knit in lace weight yarn, so on reflection my pattern choice and it’s subsequent adaption now seems even more crazy. It’s slow progress but it’s mindful process knitting (I’m averaging 2 to 3 rows each evening) rather than speedy product knitting. Although I’d be fibbing if I denied doing the mental maths to see how long I will be knitting this for. I’m guessing it will take me until at least the end of May. But the Teeswater is gorgeous with a lovely lustre so it is hardly a chore!

I also don’t have a travel project on the go at the moment so must remedy that by casting on soon. I’m thinking socks. But am in a quandary over which pattern to choose. There are just so many beautiful ones. I have a high twist beautiful Blue Faced Leicester/Nylon mix in a peach shade already balled up. Which sock pattern is your go to favourite for an easy knit?

The Siri Cardigan pattern can be found here

Devon Sun Yarns is here

The hat pattern is available on Ravelry

Sweater Bunts pattern is here

Click here for Kate Davies Designs

Daughter of a Shepherd is here

Gudrun Johnston’s Flukra pattern is on Ravelry

Darning. How it came to this.

Like a lot of people, I knitted when I was a child, and, maybe slightly more unusually, I continued well into my twenties, but, the closure of our local yarn store when the proprietress retired and with the cost of good quality yarn being beyond my, then, meagre resources (and I really couldn’t be persuaded to make any more garments from acrylic), I gradually stopped knitting. That’s not to say I stopped crafting. But I did stop knitting. Or at least knitting regularly.

Then after ages and ages, two things happened. The first was that I had my children. For the benefit of those readers who haven’t had a peek at my “about me” page, I have 5 year old twins, a boy and a girl, and I was (and remain) astonished at how exhausting parenting is. For a period of about 6 months, in order to cope with my 4am starts, I would fall asleep on the couch by eight o’clock each evening. And so, it was in an effort to stay awake (and remember who my husband was) that I came to the conclusion if I was doing something with my hands, it would be harder for me to nod off in the evenings. So I bought some yarn and patterns, and picked up some needles and started knitting. I made a cardi for my daughter and a couple of sleeveless pullovers for my little boy and was generally pretty pleased with them.  

Then, three months later, I realised these garments were getting a bit snug, then about a month after that, they were definitely too small. At this point, it dawned on me that babies grow really fast. So, if I was going to knit their clothes, I was going to have to knit a size up so they would get a decent amount of wear from them. But it takes longer to knit a bigger garment so it was a couple more months before I finished the next cardi for my daughter. By this point, she had learnt the word NO! and refused to wear any form of knitted garment. I persevered for a while but attempting to put her little arm into any knitwear lead to tears and tantrums. Then summer arrived, and I surrendered the battle and the needles (but not the war -although that is a subject worthy of a post all on its own),

Then the second thing happened; my very good school friend Gail taught herself to crochet. I loved the things she was making and, I was missing yarn, so she set me up with a crochet hook and got me started on granny squares. For the whole of that Autumn and Winter, I made blankets. I made them with such a fervour, my husband started to fear for my sanity. We soon had more blankets than beds but I couldn’t stop. I started blanket after blanket. Bought yarn pack after yarn pack. Joined Facebook group after Facebook group. And then I discovered hand dyed yarn.  

And here is the thing. Until that point in my life I’d never heard of sock weight yarn. Obviously I’d heard it called by its other name -4ply – but not sock weight. And then I had a conversation in my head that went something like “this is called sock weight. Does that mean you can knit socks with it? Wait, socks are knitted? I could knit socks!” 

And so I did. A mini obsession was born. I made lots and lots of socks and was supremely happy with every pair. But that was a while ago now and it’s funny how these mini obsessions go in cycles. The sock phase was superseded by a shawl phase (as these are also often knitted with sock weight yarn) which, in turn, was superseded by my recent, and still continuing, hat phase.   

I mention this now because, yesterday, I noticed that my most favourite watermelon socks (pictured above), made from fabulous hand dyed yarn from Abi Grasso, have a hole in the sole. Whilst I’ve done some other forms of mending, I have never darned anything and will admit to feel a bit daunted by the prospect. So, if you need me, I’ll be watching sock darning videos over on YouTube and wondering whether to invest in a darning mushroom.